Appalachian Trail

This driving route parallels the hiking trail, from the top of New England to the heart of Dixie, taking you through continuous natural beauty—without the sweat, bugs, or blisters.

Wilmington and Route 9

Route 100 catches a panoramic view of Mt. Snow as the roadway descends into Wilmington (pop. 2,225), a picturesque village of 18th- and 19th-century shops and houses built along the Deerfield River. Wilmington also has some great old-fashioned places to eat, like Dot’s Restaurant (5 W. Main St., 802/464-7284), a white-clapboard Vermont institution, famous for its pancakes, burgers, chili, and pies. The chamber of commerce is named after the local Mount Snow ski resort rather than the town, so you know who pays the bills around here. Nevertheless, the warmer months see a fair bit of activity in the galleries and antiques shops, and for classical music lovers, the Marlboro Music Festival (802/254-2394 in summer only) marks summer’s zenith at Marlboro College, a dozen miles east toward Brattleboro on Route 9. Between mid-July and mid-August several score of the world’s finest classical musicians perform here in one of the nation’s most distinguished annual chamber music series.

Heading westward toward Bennington, you can continue west on Route 9 to Bennington and follow US-7 south through Williamstown, or you can make your way south through the much less developed areas along Route 8 and Route 100, which take you through the heavy-duty mill town of North Adams.

Dot’s Restaurant (5 W. Main St.)